Doce Pares Amarras

Among the signature aspects of Doce Pares that we teach at Sage are the Amarras (sometimes spelled Amerras). Amarras are twirling patterns consisting of striking combinations which require proper body mechanics and illustrate fighting tactics that are particular to this system of Escrima. Doce Pares has many Amarras, and many of the movements in them are similar. Students learn these the hard way, through gross repetition, and in doing so, program their muscle memory to deliver useful combinations with proper body mechanics.   Basic Amarras The first 6 Amarras were taught to us by Grandmaster Sipin. The basic Amarras all connect, where one ends, the next one begins. The first four Amarras are required for Yellow Belt. Amarra #1 (Bend your knees on the Reverse Arko) Arko – Reverse Arko Up Twice Arko – Reverse Arko Bartikal Redoble (Lean Backward) 2 Flywheels (Hulog) Reverse Arko Amarra #2 (Deeper Stance) Upward Diagonal Slash – Downward Diagonal Slash (Bulan) Up Twice Upward Diagonal Slash – Reverse Arko (Bulan) Songkite – Reverse Arko Plansa – Reverse Arko Amarra #3 (Upright, shallow stance) Arko – Reverse Arko Plansa – Medya 2 Level Backhand Kurbado Strikes Reverse Arko (to floor) Straight Thrust to Solar Plexus (Thrust off the bounce) Amarra #4 (Deep stance to upright) Air Flip (They block the thrust, you trap their hand and roll the stick) Upward Figure 8 Strikes at the Knees Upward Figure 8 Strikes at the Hands 2 Abaniko Strikes to the Head (Open – Closed) Downward Punyo to Head Upward Punyo to Ribs/Elbow Flip Down Vertical Backhand Abaniko to Face Reverse Arko   Sparring Amarras Amarras #5 and 6 are shorter sparring combinations that illustrate tactics in the Corto Kurbado style. They have 5 strikes and 6 strikes respectively. These are required...

San Miguel Sets

At Sage we teach the signature aspects of Doce Pares. Students are exposed first and foremost to the Amarras, San Miguel Sets, Sinawali and basic Abecedario at novice levels. From these students can begin to emulate the stylistic characteristics of movement integral to that system. At intermediate levels, the focus changes towards training the live hand, developing sensitivity and ingraining fluidity and economy of motion. At advanced levels, it has to do with flow and speed, and making previously learned skills intuitive. One of the most important aspects we train in are the San Miguel sets. Specifically, these are patterns of movement, striking, footwork and body mechanics that are used in the 12th form in the Doce Pares system referred to as ‘San Miguel.’ Even though the 12th form is not required until 3rd Degree Black Belt in this system, the reason I teach this first is because the memes that these sets represent will be seen over and over again throughout all the other forms and amarras. By being exposed to this first, students develop a familiarization with the core movements of this system, which in turn, helps them learn the other material more quickly. Each set uses the same basic footwork, specifically a back step which turns the hips, a hooking step to evade a strike at the leg or body, replacing that foot forward, then an advancing step which again turns the hips. In the San Miguel Sets each set begins with an opening strike or series of strikes, which are followed by a pattern of strikes and footwork. The end of each set is identical, the only thing that changes are the opening strikes. Beginning with the weapon in the rear hand, each set begins defensively, by stepping back: 1....

Doce Pares: Eskrido

Eskrido is a system of locking and throwing that compliments the stickfighting of Doce Pares. These strategies were created by Ciricao “Cacoy” Canete, as a combination of Eskrima, Judo and Aikido....

Doce Pares Documentary...

BBC Documentary “The Way of the Warrior: Eskrima, the Filipino Way” – Michael Croucher & Dr. Howard Reid, 1983. This documentary was shot one year after Doce Pares’ 50th...