Chinese Archery

Jian Shu Archery

Fast Archery

Doublet Technique Hun Method of Fast...

Turkish Archery

Gökmen Altinkulp reveals his passion for archery. In this video, we get to see a real life depiction of the warriors described in historic sources. Altinkulp displays some of the incredible techniques mastered by medieval warriors   Extraordinary techniques in Turkish archery: Jarmakee and Majra Turkish archery is unique in many aspects. It has had remarkable influences on “Saracen Archery” through the Turkish mercanaries employed in early Islamic armies and have later founded the Mameluk State. The very early European records, especially that of Crusaders, was about Seljuk Turks who Crusader armies encountered at the very beginning. The video is about an interesting shooting technique, jarmakee, and using an over-draw device called “majra”. Pulling and releasing the string of a bow were executed with various techniques and thumb-release (or Mongolian release) was one of them. It is an old technique and has been used widely by many nations and tribes in history. Turks were one of those who perfected the technique and used for centuries successfully both on battlefields and in sport archery. Here we demonstrate how the shot is stabilized by this shooting technique and what an ancient Turkish archer might have been capable of. In Ottoman era sportive archery existed as early as 15th century. In the earliest capital cities Bursa and Edirne there were special archery fields called “okmeydani”. After the conquest of Constantinople in 1453 Sultan Mehmed II “the Conqueror” established an okmeydani for archers in the newly named city Istanbul. Flight archery has always been popular all the 623 years (1300-1923) in which the Empire survived. Bilek siperi or siper was an over-draw device that has been used by flight archers to draw shorter arrows beyond the bow grip. Here you can see how it is used. Unboxing the...

Kyudo: Japanese Archery...

One Shot One Life The pursuit of excellence through the art of Japanese Archery or Kyudo – ‘the way of the bow’. Over six years ago we posted a kyudo video which received many comments, most of which focused negatively on the master archer missing the target. For many people it is hard to seperate success from not hitting the target. In our new film, One Shot. One Life, one of the kyudo masters is very accurate… he simply never misses the target. Yet he states: “The techniques for facing and hitting the target are quite simple. I used to be a national team member, and at that time I had to hit the target no matter what, practicing until my hands turned black. Eventually all that technique became obsolete in exchange for the ability to express myself through the bow.” In our film this master archer prepares for the extremely difficult 8th dan grading, whose pass rate is below 1%. But for all his ability to hit the target, can he pass this strict examination? We leave you with more quotes from our film that offer insight into the art of Japanese archery…”Even if we dedicate a lifetime, we will not be able to master it. If we keep this in our mind we can continue further. This is one of the things I was taught by my Sensei and I will not forget. I strive to practice everyday feeling like a beginner. My Sensei often said “when we face the target we are facing ourselves as a mirror”. It is wrong if we do not face the target in this manner. Ultimately, no technique is left, no form is left, nothing but the archer’s humanity remains. For the observer, this is very...