Doce Pares Amarras

Among the signature aspects of Doce Pares that we teach at Sage are the Amarras (sometimes spelled Amerras). Amarras are twirling patterns consisting of striking combinations which require proper body mechanics and illustrate fighting tactics that are particular to this system of Escrima. Doce Pares has many Amarras, and many of the movements in them are similar. Students learn these the hard way, through gross repetition, and in doing so, program their muscle memory to deliver useful combinations with proper body mechanics.   Basic Amarras The first 6 Amarras were taught to us by Grandmaster Sipin. The basic Amarras all connect, where one ends, the next one begins. The first four Amarras are required for Yellow Belt. Amarra #1 (Bend your knees on the Reverse Arko) Arko – Reverse Arko Up Twice Arko – Reverse Arko Bartikal Redoble (Lean Backward) 2 Flywheels (Hulog) Reverse Arko Amarra #2 (Deeper Stance) Upward Diagonal Slash – Downward Diagonal Slash (Bulan) Up Twice Upward Diagonal Slash – Reverse Arko (Bulan) Songkite – Reverse Arko Plansa – Reverse Arko Amarra #3 (Upright, shallow stance) Arko – Reverse Arko Plansa – Medya 2 Level Backhand Kurbado Strikes Reverse Arko (to floor) Straight Thrust to Solar Plexus (Thrust off the bounce) Amarra #4 (Deep stance to upright) Air Flip (They block the thrust, you trap their hand and roll the stick) Upward Figure 8 Strikes at the Knees Upward Figure 8 Strikes at the Hands 2 Abaniko Strikes to the Head (Open – Closed) Downward Punyo to Head Upward Punyo to Ribs/Elbow Flip Down Vertical Backhand Abaniko to Face Reverse Arko   Sparring Amarras Amarras #5 and 6 are shorter sparring combinations that illustrate tactics in the Corto Kurbado style. They have 5 strikes and 6 strikes respectively. These are required...

San Miguel Sets

At Sage we teach the signature aspects of Doce Pares. Students are exposed first and foremost to the Amarras, San Miguel Sets, Sinawali and basic Abecedario at novice levels. From these students can begin to emulate the stylistic characteristics of movement integral to that system. At intermediate levels, the focus changes towards training the live hand, developing sensitivity and ingraining fluidity and economy of motion. At advanced levels, it has to do with flow and speed, and making previously learned skills intuitive. One of the most important aspects we train in are the San Miguel sets. Specifically, these are patterns of movement, striking, footwork and body mechanics that are used in the 12th form in the Doce Pares system referred to as ‘San Miguel.’ Even though the 12th form is not required until 3rd Degree Black Belt in this system, the reason I teach this first is because the memes that these sets represent will be seen over and over again throughout all the other forms and amarras. By being exposed to this first, students develop a familiarization with the core movements of this system, which in turn, helps them learn the other material more quickly. Each set uses the same basic footwork, specifically a back step which turns the hips, a hooking step to evade a strike at the leg or body, replacing that foot forward, then an advancing step which again turns the hips. In the San Miguel Sets each set begins with an opening strike or series of strikes, which are followed by a pattern of strikes and footwork. The end of each set is identical, the only thing that changes are the opening strikes. Beginning with the weapon in the rear hand, each set begins defensively, by stepping back: 1....

Story: A Wizard’s Advice...

Excerpted from “The Once and Future King” by T.H.White One day, towards the end of his childhood, the future King Arthur was having a terrible day. Following the advice of his seniors, he went to see his teacher, Merlyn. Asking his advice on the matter Arthur spoke, “Well, what about it?” “The best thing for being sad,” replied Merlyn, beginning to puff and blow, “is to learn something. That is the only thing that never fails. You may grow old and trembling in your anatomies, you may lie awake at night listening to the disorder of your veins, you may miss your only love, you may see the world about you devastated by evil lunatics, or know your honor trampled in the sewers of baser minds. There is only one thing for it then – learn.” “Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never exhaust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting. Learning is the thing for you.” “Look at what a lot of things there are to learn – pure science, the only purity there is. You can learn astronomy in a lifetime, natural history in three, literature in six. And then, after you have exhausted a milliard lifetimes in biology and medicine and theocriticism and geography and history and economics – why you can start to make a cartwheel out of the appropriate wood, or spend fifty years learning to begin to learn to defeat your adversary at fencing. After that you can start again on mathematics, until it is time to learn to plough.” “Do you think you have learned anything?” Merlyn inquired. “I have learned, and been happy.” King Arthur said....

BJJ: Animal Drills

30 Animal Grappling Solo Drills in Less Than 7 Min – Jason Scully  

Story: The War Prayer, By Mark Twain

It was a time of great and exalting excitement. The country was up in arms, the war was on, in every breast burned the holy fire of patriotism; the drums were beating, the bands playing, the toy pistols popping, the bunched firecrackers hissing and spluttering; on every hand and far down the receding and fading spread of roofs and balconies a fluttering wilderness of flags flashed in the sun; daily the young volunteers marched down the wide avenue gay and fine in their new uniforms, the proud fathers and mothers and sisters and sweethearts cheering them with voices choked with happy emotion as they swung by; nightly the packed mass meetings listened, panting, to patriot oratory with stirred the deepest deeps of their hearts, and which they interrupted at briefest intervals with cyclones of applause, the tears running down their cheeks the while; in the churches the pastors preached devotion to flag and country, and invoked the God of Battles beseeching His aid in our good cause in outpourings of fervid eloquence which moved every listener. It was indeed a glad and gracious time, and the half dozen rash spirits that ventured to disapprove of the war and cast a doubt upon its righteousness straightway got such a stern and angry warning that for their personal safety’s sake they quickly shrank out of sight and offended no more in that way. Sunday morning came–next day the battalions would leave for the front; the church was filled; the volunteers were there, their young faces alight with martial dreams–visions of the stern advance, the gathering momentum, the rushing charge, the flashing sabers, the flight of the foe, the tumult, the enveloping smoke, the fierce pursuit, the surrender! Then home from the war, bronzed heroes, welcomed, adored, submerged in golden seas of glory! With the volunteers sat their dear ones, proud, happy, and envied by the neighbors and friends who had no sons and brothers to send forth to the field of honor, there to win for the flag, or, failing, die the noblest of noble deaths. The service proceeded; a war chapter from the Old Testament was read; the first prayer was said; it was followed by an organ burst that shook the building, and with one impulse the house rose, with glowing eyes and beating hearts, and poured out that tremendous invocation: God the all-terrible! Thou who ordainest Thunder thy clarion and lightning thy sword! Then came the “long” prayer. None could remember the like of it for passionate pleading and moving and beautiful language. The burden of its supplication was, that an ever-merciful and benignant Father of us all would watch over our noble young soldiers, and aid, comfort, and encourage them in their patriotic work; bless them, shield them in the day of battle and the hour of peril, bear them in His mighty hand, make them strong and confident, invincible in the bloody onset; help them crush the foe, grant to them and to their flag and country imperishable honor and glory– An aged stranger entered and moved with slow and noiseless step up the main aisle, his eyes fixed upon the minister, his long body clothed in a robe that reached to his feet, his head bare, his white hair descending in a frothy cataract to his shoulders, his seamy face unnaturally pale, pale even to ghastliness. With all eyes following him and wondering, he made his silent way; without pausing, he ascended to the preacher’s side and stood there waiting. With shut lids the preacher, unconscious of his presence, continued his moving prayer, and at last finished it with the words, uttered in fervent appeal, “Bless our arms, grant us the victory, O Lord and God, Father and Protector of our land and flag!” The stranger touched his arm, motioned him to step aside– which the startled minister did–and took his place. During some moments...

Story: Walking Zen

A long ago time ago in the hills of Quong Zu province, there once lived a revered old monk who was a master of Zen Buddhism. One day he decided that he would make a pilgrimage to a neighboring monastery, and not wishing to make the journey alone, he decided to take along one of his young disciples. They started their journey early the next morning and in the true spirit of Zen each walked along engrossed in his own thoughts, and so they journeyed for many hours without speaking. By midday they had come to a small stream, here they noticed a young girl dressed in fine silk obviously contemplating how best to cross the stream without getting her precious clothes wet. Immediately the old monk walked over to the young girl and in one smooth motion, he picked her up in his arms and walked out into the stream, then after carrying her safely to the other side, he gently put her down and walked on without having said a single word. His disciple having watched this whole incident was in a state of complete shock, for he knew it was strictly forbidden for a monk to come into physical contact with another person. Quickly, he too crossed the stream, and then ran to catch up with his master, together they once again walked on in silence. Finally at sunset they made camp and settled down for the night. The next morning after prayers and meditation the old monk and his disciple once again continued their journey in silence. After many miles and no longer able to contain his curiosity, the disciple called to his master and said, “Master may I ask you a question? ” “Of course you may” his master...

The Black Belt Test

Justin Angelos tests for his Brazilian/Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Black Belt under 8th Degree Red/Black Belt Pedro Sauer at Ultimate Jiu-Jitsu in Boise, Idaho. Saturday, May 14th,...

The Brown Belt Test

Here’s a rough video of Coach Jim Bundy’s Brown Belt exam under Tony Rinaldi (Pedro Sauer Association).

Story: The Tea Cup Lesson...

A learned man once went to a Zen teacher to inquire about Zen. As the Zen teacher explained, the learned man would frequently interrupt him with remarks like, “Oh, yes, we have that too….” and so on. Finally the Zen teacher stopped talking and began to serve tea to the learned man. He poured the cup full, and then kept pouring until the cup overflowed. “Enough!” the learned man once more interrupted. “No more can go into the cup!” “Indeed, I see,” answered the Zen teacher. “If you do not first empty the cup, how can you taste my cup of...

Story: The Stone Cutter...

Once upon a time there was a stone cutter. The stone cutter lived in a land where a life of privilege meant being powerful. Looking at his life he decided that he was unsatisfied with the way things were and so he set out to become the most powerful thing in the land. Looking around his land he wondered to himself what is it to be powerful. Looking up he saw the Sun shining down on all the land. “The Sun must be the most powerful thing that there is, for it shines down on all things, and all things grow from it’s touch.” So he became the Sun. Days later, as he shone his power down on the inhabitants of the land, there came a cloud which passed beneath him obstructing his brilliance. Frustrated he realized that the Sun was not the most powerful thing in the land, if a simple cloud could interrupt his greatness. So he became a cloud, in fact, he became the most powerful storm that the world had ever seen. And so he blew his rain and lightning, and resounded with thunder all over the land, demonstrating that he was the most powerful. Until one day he came across a boulder. Down and down he poured and his thunder roared, lightning flashed and filled the sky, striking the ground near the boulder. His winds blew and blew and blew, and yet, despite all his efforts, he could not budge the boulder. Frustrated again, he realized that the storm was not the most powerful thing in the land, rather it must be the boulder. So he became the boulder. For days he sat, unmovable, and impassive, demonstrating his power, until one day, a stone cutter came and chiseled him...