Sage Curriculum

Justice: Hired Guns

Posted by on Dec 10, 2013 in Curriculum, Ethics, Philosophy | 0 comments

Justice: Hired Guns

  Justice: What’s The Right Thing To Do?Episode 5 – Hired Guns   Part One: Hired Guns During the Civil War, men drafted into war had the option of hiring substitutes to fight in their place. Professor Sandel asks students whether they consider this policy just. Many do not, arguing that it is unfair to allow the affluent to avoid serving and risking their lives by paying less privileged citizens to fight in their place. This leads to a classroom debate about war and conscription. Is todays voluntary army open to the same objection? Should military service be allocated by the labor market or by conscription? What role should patriotism play, and what are the obligations of citizenship? Is there a civic duty to serve ones country? And are utilitarians and libertarians able to account for this duty?   Part Two: Motherhood – For Sale In this lecture, Professor Sandel examines the principle of free-market exchange in light of the contemporary controversy over reproductive rights. Sandel begins with a humorous discussion of the business of egg and sperm donation. He then describes the case of Baby M”—a famous legal battle in the mid-eighties that raised the unsettling question, Who owns a baby?” In 1985, a woman named Mary Beth Whitehead signed a contract with a New Jersey couple, agreeing to be a surrogate mother in exchange for a fee of $10,000. However, after giving birth, Ms. Whitehead decided she wanted to keep the child, and the case went to court. Sandel and students debate the nature of informed consent, the morality of selling a human life, and the meaning of maternal rights....

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Justice: This Land is My Land

Posted by on Dec 7, 2013 in Curriculum, Ethics, Philosophy | 0 comments

Justice: This Land is My Land

  Justice: What’s The Right Thing To Do?Episode 4 – This Land is My Land   Part One: This Land is My Land The philosopher John Locke believes that individuals have certain rights so fundamental that no government can ever take them away. These rights—to life, liberty and property—were given to us as human beings in the the state of nature, a time before government and laws were created. According to Locke, our natural rights are governed by the law of nature, known by reason, which says that we can neither give them up nor take them away from anyone else. Sandel wraps up the lecture by raising a question: what happens to our natural rights once we enter society and consent to a system of laws?   Part Two: Consenting Adults If we all have unalienable rights to life, liberty, and property, how can a government enforce tax laws passed by the representatives of a mere majority? Doesnt that amount to taking some peoples property without their consent? Lockes response is that we give our tacit consent to obey the tax laws passed by a majority when we choose to live in a society. Therefore, taxation is legitimate and compatible with individual rights, as long as it applies to everyone and does not arbitrarily single anyone out....

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BJJ: 47 Leg Locks

Posted by on Dec 7, 2013 in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Class Notes, Grappling, Submissions | 0 comments

BJJ: 47 Leg Locks

47 Leg Lock Techniques In Just 4 Minutes – Jason Scully This video demonstrates 47 different leg lock techniques including kneebars, ankle locks, heel hooks, toe holds, and calf slicers.  

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Justice: Free to Choose

Posted by on Dec 5, 2013 in Curriculum, Ethics, Philosophy | 0 comments

Justice: Free to Choose

  Justice: What’s The Right Thing To Do?Episode 3 – Free to Choose   Part One: Free to Choose Sandel introduces the libertarian conception of individual rights, according to which only a minimal state is justified. Libertarians argue that government shouldnt have the power to enact laws that 1) protect people from themselves, such as seat belt laws, 2) impose some peoples moral values on society as a whole, or 3) redistribute income from the rich to the poor. Sandel explains the libertarian notion that redistributive taxation is akin to forced labor with references to Bill Gates and Michael Jordan.   Part Two: Who Owns Me? Libertarian philosopher Robert Nozick makes the case that taxing the wealthy—to pay for housing, health care, and education for the poor—is a form of coercion. Students first discuss the arguments behind redistributive taxation. Dont most poor people need the social services they receive in order to survive? If you live in a society that has a system of progressive taxation, arent you obligated to pay your taxes? Dont many rich people often acquire their wealth through sheer luck or family fortune? A group of students dubbed Team Libertarian volunteers to defend the libertarian philosophy against these objections....

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BJJ: 23 Transitions

Posted by on Dec 5, 2013 in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Class Notes, Escapes & Counters, Grappling | 0 comments

BJJ: 23 Transitions

23 BJJ Transitions, Scrambles, and Counters in Less Than 8 Min – Jason Scully  

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BJJ: 24 Gi Chokes

Posted by on Dec 3, 2013 in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Class Notes, Grappling, Submissions | 0 comments

BJJ: 24 Gi Chokes

24 Gi Chokes in Less Than 5 Minutes In this video you’ll video 24 Gi Choke techniques to help you get more ideas to expand you attacking game with the gi on. The great thing about the gi is that you can not only choke your opponent with their collar but you can also feed your lapel, and their lapel as well to set up a lot of attacks and for additional positional control as well....

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Justice: Putting a Price Tag on Life

Posted by on Dec 2, 2013 in Curriculum, Ethics, Philosophy | 0 comments

Justice: Putting a Price Tag on Life

  Justice: What’s The Right Thing To Do?Episode 2 – Putting a Price Tag on Life   Part One: Putting a Price Tag on Life Today, companies and governments often use Jeremy Benthams utilitarian logic under the name of cost-benefit analysis. Sandel presents some contemporary cases in which cost-benefit analysis was used to put a dollar value on human life. The cases give rise to several objections to the utilitarian logic of seeking the greatest good for the greatest number. Should we always give more weight to the happiness of a majority, even if the majority is cruel or ignoble? Is it possible to sum up and compare all values using a common measure like money?   Part Two: How to Measure Pleasure Sandel introduces J.S. Mill, a utilitarian philosopher who attempts to defend utilitarianism against the objections raised by critics of the doctrine. Mill argues that seeking the greatest good for the greatest number is compatible with protecting individual rights, and that utilitarianism can make room for a distinction between higher and lower pleasures. Mills idea is that the higher pleasure is always the pleasure preferred by a well-informed majority. Sandel tests this theory by playing video clips from three very different forms of entertainment: Shakespeares Hamlet, the reality show Fear Factor, and The Simpsons. Students debate which experience provides the higher pleasure, and whether Mills defense of utilitarianism is successful....

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42 Takedowns

Posted by on Dec 2, 2013 in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Class Notes, Grappling, Throws & Takedowns | 0 comments

42 Takedowns

42 Takedown Techniques in Just 6 Minutes BJJ Grappling – Jason Scully In this video you will find MY favorite takedown techniques that I personally use successfully on a regular basis in training and in competition. These technique reflect my game and are all high percentage for me. Hopefully they can hey with some ideas and concepts to improve your grappling in some way....

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Fencing Concepts

Posted by on Dec 1, 2013 in Class Notes, Curriculum, Filipino Martial Arts, Trapping, Wednesday Workshop Topics | 0 comments

Fencing Concepts

Class 1 – Fencing Concepts While there are many perspectives on the use of a long staff or short staff in fighting, like most other aspects of Martial Arts, in terms of combat, simpler is often better. There are a great many ways in which to wield a staff. Some cultures and traditions use an end grip, with a majority of the staff used to strike with, others use a thirds grip, effectively dividing the staff in three pieces, which tends to focus on using both ends of the staff. While in certain circumstances each of these maybe appropriate and necessary, it is often true that a simple direct line of attack, that being a thrust, is the best tactic, as this type of attack is both immediate and direct, and as such can take the initiative away from your opponent with a stop-hit. In this sense, the concepts we’ll discuss below are identical to fencing theory, and also JKD trapping and Centerline theory. While considering these principles, ask yourself when other methods of using the staff as a weapon would be appropriate.   Fencing Concepts Starting from a Right-hand Dominant Position (gripping the staff with the right hand forward, left hand at the hip, both thumbs pointed towards the offensive end of the staff), we place our staff against that of our opponent from a distance at which we would need to enter in order to strike. Let’s refer to this as Largo Mano with an engagement. Our opponent has adopted an identical stance, both people with their right hand and right foot forward, identical grips. The staves cross at the last 1/4 of the shaft. This represents a fairly neutral position, and we are presented with a conundrum. If I attempt to thrust at my opponent’s torso or throat, their staff sufficiently occupies Centerline, that I cannot get a direct line to the target. Therefore I must create an opportunity (or seize upon an opportunity if it should arise). If the opponent rears his weapon back to strike at me, we have a situation not unlike trapping “In absence of resistance, we strike.” Knowing this, therefore, and having this engagement of one staff against the other, we must find a way to create that opening without becoming vulnerable to our opponent’s thrust. Stage 1 – The Beat First, we attempt, with a quick sharp strike to the opponent’s weapon, to move their weapon off of Centerline, and create our opportunity to thrust. We must be sure to not create too great an opening in winding up for that beat. Practice this with the thrust. The empty-hand trapping equivalent of this is a simple Gnoy Pak Da from an outside forearm reference point. Stage 2 – The Recovery As we Beat the opponent’s weapon off of Centerline and thrust, they recover Centerline and block the thrust. Practice this to develop the timing for the recovery. In empty-hand trapping, this would be the equivalent of switching to a Biu Sao outside parry to deflect the Chung Choy that follows the Gnoy Pak Da. Stage 3 – Positive to Negative As our opponent recovers Centerline from the Beat, we retract the tip of our staff, to allow their recovery to pass Centerline, opening a line for our thrust on the...

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BJJ: No Gi Chokes

Posted by on Dec 1, 2013 in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Class Notes, Curriculum, Submissions | 0 comments

BJJ: No Gi Chokes

A Lot of High Percentage No Gi Chokes and Variations in Just 8 Minutes – Jason Scully In this video you will see a lot of no-gi choke options such as the Brabo choke situations, hug choke, Anaconda choke situations, North/South choke situations, Guillotine variations, rear naked choke variations, and paper cutter choke. Chokes are submissions where the strength of your opponent plays even less of a factor because as it is much harder for them and most of the time not possible for them to muscle out of a choke when you start to set in with it....

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Justice: The Moral Side of Murder

Posted by on Nov 30, 2013 in Curriculum, Ethics, Philosophy | 1 comment

Justice: The Moral Side of Murder

  Justice: What’s The Right Thing To Do?Episode 1 – The Moral Side of Murder   Part One: The Moral Side of Murder If you had to choose between (1) killing one person to save the lives of five others and (2) doing nothing even though you knew that five people would die right before your eyes if you did nothing—what would you do? What would be the right thing to do? Thats the hypothetical scenario Professor Michael Sandel uses to launch his course on moral reasoning. After the majority of students votes for killing the one person in order to save the lives of five others, Sandel presents three similar moral conundrums—each one artfully designed to make the decision more difficult. As students stand up to defend their conflicting choices, it becomes clear that the assumptions behind our moral reasoning are often contradictory, and the question of what is right and what is wrong is not always black and white.   Part Two: The Case For Cannibalism Sandel introduces the principles of utilitarian philosopher, Jeremy Bentham, with a famous nineteenth century legal case involving a shipwrecked crew of four. After nineteen days lost at sea, the captain decides to kill the weakest amongst them, the young cabin boy, so that the rest can feed on his blood and body to survive. The case sets up a classroom debate about the moral validity of utilitarianism—and its doctrine that the right thing to do is whatever produces “the greatest good for the greatest number.”...

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Doce Pares Amarras

Posted by on Nov 30, 2013 in Class Notes, Curriculum, Doce Pares, Kids Program | 0 comments

Doce Pares Amarras

Among the signature aspects of Doce Pares that we teach at Sage are the Amarras (sometimes spelled Amerras). Amarras are twirling patterns consisting of striking combinations which require proper body mechanics and illustrate fighting tactics that are particular to this system of Escrima. Doce Pares has many Amarras, and many of the movements in them are similar. Students learn these the hard way, through gross repetition, and in doing so, program their muscle memory to deliver useful combinations with proper body mechanics.   Basic Amarras The first 6 Amarras were taught to us by Grandmaster Sipin. The basic Amarras all connect, where one ends, the next one begins. The first four Amarras are required for Yellow Belt. Amarra #1 (Bend your knees on the Reverse Arko) Arko – Reverse Arko Up Twice Arko – Reverse Arko Bartikal Redoble (Lean Backward) 2 Flywheels (Hulog) Reverse Arko Amarra #2 (Deeper Stance) Upward Diagonal Slash – Downward Diagonal Slash (Bulan) Up Twice Upward Diagonal Slash – Reverse Arko (Bulan) Songkite – Reverse Arko Plansa – Reverse Arko Amarra #3 (Upright, shallow stance) Arko – Reverse Arko Plansa – Medya 2 Level Backhand Kurbado Strikes Reverse Arko (to floor) Straight Thrust to Solar Plexus (Thrust off the bounce) Amarra #4 (Deep stance to upright) Air Flip (They block the thrust, you trap their hand and roll the stick) Upward Figure 8 Strikes at the Knees Upward Figure 8 Strikes at the Hands 2 Abaniko Strikes to the Head (Open – Closed) Downward Punyo to Head Upward Punyo to Ribs/Elbow Flip Down Vertical Backhand Abaniko to Face Reverse Arko   Sparring Amarras Amarras #5 and 6 are shorter sparring combinations that illustrate tactics in the Corto Kurbado style. They have 5 strikes and 6 strikes respectively. These are required for Orange Belt. Amarra #5 Downward Diagonal Slash to Head Flip Downward Vertical Abaniko Strike to Face (Hand Low – Tip High) Flip Low Vertical Abaniko Strike to Groin/Hands (Hand High – Tip Low) Level Forehand Abaniko Strike to Temple (Open) Level Backhand Abaniko Strike to Temple (Closed) Amarra #6 Downward Diagonal Slash to Head (Forehand) Downward Diagonal Slash to Head (Backhand) Downward Diagonal Slash to Head (Forehand) Flip Downward Vertical Abaniko Strike to Face (Hand Low – Tip High) Level Backhand Abaniko Strike to Temple (Closed) Downward Diagonal Slash to Head (Forehand)   15 Count Amarra The 15 Count Amarra is a recent convention that requires deeper stances, the simultaneous use of the live hand while striking, and introduces the “Sidewinder” strike. We typically break this down into three parts until the students memorize the pattern. The 15 Count Amarra is required for Green Belt. Part 1 1. Forehand Diagonal Downward Slash (Trap Inward) 2. Backhand Diagonal Downward Slash (Trap Backhand) 3. Forehand Level Slash (Trap Inward) 4. Backhand Level Slash (Trap Backhand) 5. Sidewinder Strike Part 2 6. Forehand Kurbado Strike Low (Waist/Elbow) 7. Forehand Kurbado Strike High (Temple/Back of Head) 8. Plansa 9. Backhand Kurbado Strike Low (Waist/Elbow) 10. Backhand Kurbado Strike High (Temple/Back of Head) 11. Sidewinder Strike Part 3 12. Half-Strike 13. Forehand Redondo 14. Songkite (Tip/Punyo/Elbow Strike) 15. Flywheel/Backhand Redondo From the 15 Count, we also get other derivative Amarras (which are taught, but not required for promotion – shown in class): 2 Count Amarra 6 then 5 Count...

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BJJ: 49 Kimura/Americana Attacks

Posted by on Nov 30, 2013 in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Class Notes, Curriculum, Grappling, Submissions | 0 comments

BJJ: 49 Kimura/Americana Attacks

49 Kimura and Americana Attacks in Less Than 6 Min – Jason Scully In this video you will find 49 different Americana and Kimura style attacks from many different situations in less than 6 minutes.  

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San Miguel Sets

Posted by on Nov 29, 2013 in Class Notes, Curriculum, Doce Pares, Kids Program | 0 comments

San Miguel Sets

At Sage we teach the signature aspects of Doce Pares. Students are exposed first and foremost to the Amarras, San Miguel Sets, Sinawali and basic Abecedario at novice levels. From these students can begin to emulate the stylistic characteristics of movement integral to that system. At intermediate levels, the focus changes towards training the live hand, developing sensitivity and ingraining fluidity and economy of motion. At advanced levels, it has to do with flow and speed, and making previously learned skills intuitive. One of the most important aspects we train in are the San Miguel sets. Specifically, these are patterns of movement, striking, footwork and body mechanics that are used in the 12th form in the Doce Pares system referred to as ‘San Miguel.’ Even though the 12th form is not required until 3rd Degree Black Belt in this system, the reason I teach this first is because the memes that these sets represent will be seen over and over again throughout all the other forms and amarras. By being exposed to this first, students develop a familiarization with the core movements of this system, which in turn, helps them learn the other material more quickly. Each set uses the same basic footwork, specifically a back step which turns the hips, a hooking step to evade a strike at the leg or body, replacing that foot forward, then an advancing step which again turns the hips. In the San Miguel Sets each set begins with an opening strike or series of strikes, which are followed by a pattern of strikes and footwork. The end of each set is identical, the only thing that changes are the opening strikes. Beginning with the weapon in the rear hand, each set begins defensively, by stepping back: 1. Step Back [opening strike] 2. Plansa or Songkite (Turn the hips) 3. Hulog (Hook step) 4. Medya & Retract 5. Hulog (Replacement step) 6. Reverse Arko (Advance, turn the hips)   San Miguel Sets The following are the terms we use to refer to each set, and what opening strike each has. These are terms that we use, and are not universal to Doce Pares. Saka – Upward Slash Hulog – Downward Slash Bala-Bala – Downward Figure 8’s Dali-Dali – Down-Down-Up-Down Cha-Cha – Thrust-Down-Up-Medya Plansa – 5 Horizontal Slashes Abaniko – 4 Abanikos-Plansa 3 Down-Bridge-Payong – Step Back 3 Downward Strikes (Inward, backhand, vertical) – Upward slash/overhead parry – Step Forward Roof Block – Step Back Plansa Arko & Step – Step Back Arko – Step Forward Reverse – Step Back Bartikal Redoble (2 Upward Figure 8’s – Plansa) Arko & Pivot – Arko to Rear – Reverse to Front – Up Twice – Arko – Reverse – Songkite     Testing Requirements: For White thru Green Belts, we use these sets as a way to judge a student’s body mechanics. We are particularly concerned with the turning of the feet and hips as they strike, the timing of the strike with their footwork, and consistency in the accuracy of their strikes. For intermediate and advanced students, we are looking for speed and fluidity as well as intuitive body mechanics.   Essential Vocabulary:   Abaniko – A fanning strike, generating power from the wrist. Arko – A forehand flourish, two inward strikes, circling overhead. Bartikal...

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BJJ: 52 Triangle Choke Setups

Posted by on Nov 29, 2013 in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Class Notes, Grappling, Submissions | 0 comments

BJJ: 52 Triangle Choke Setups

52 Triangle Choke Set Ups In Just 8 Minutes – Jason Scully In this video you’ll find 52 different set ups for the triangle choke which is one of the most effective submission in grappling. I hope it helps give you some ideas on how to expand your game and your attacks.  

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Story: A Wizard’s Advice

Posted by on Nov 28, 2013 in Curriculum, Kids Program, Reading List, Stories | 0 comments

Story: A Wizard’s Advice

Excerpted from “The Once and Future King” by T.H.White One day, towards the end of his childhood, the future King Arthur was having a terrible day. Following the advice of his seniors, he went to see his teacher, Merlyn. Asking his advice on the matter Arthur spoke, “Well, what about it?” “The best thing for being sad,” replied Merlyn, beginning to puff and blow, “is to learn something. That is the only thing that never fails. You may grow old and trembling in your anatomies, you may lie awake at night listening to the disorder of your veins, you may miss your only love, you may see the world about you devastated by evil lunatics, or know your honor trampled in the sewers of baser minds. There is only one thing for it then – learn.” “Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never exhaust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting. Learning is the thing for you.” “Look at what a lot of things there are to learn – pure science, the only purity there is. You can learn astronomy in a lifetime, natural history in three, literature in six. And then, after you have exhausted a milliard lifetimes in biology and medicine and theocriticism and geography and history and economics – why you can start to make a cartwheel out of the appropriate wood, or spend fifty years learning to begin to learn to defeat your adversary at fencing. After that you can start again on mathematics, until it is time to learn to plough.” “Do you think you have learned anything?” Merlyn inquired. “I have learned, and been happy.” King Arthur said. “That’s right then,” said Merlyn, “try to remember what you have...

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BJJ: 39 Armlocks

Posted by on Nov 27, 2013 in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Class Notes, Grappling, Submissions | 0 comments

BJJ: 39 Armlocks

39 Armbars & Arm Locks in Less Than 4 Minutes – Jason Scully In this video you’ll see a demonstrations of 39 Armbars and Armlocks in less than 4 minutes.  

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Game: Rotation

Posted by on Nov 27, 2013 in Games | 0 comments

Game: Rotation

Rotation The goal of this game is to rearrange the shapes in the larger circle to match the shapes in the smaller one within a certain number of moves. Pieces only move by rotation (hence the name). The puzzles get more challenging as you progress. Designer: Interactive Diode Space Contact:...

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BJJ: Closed Guard Combinations

Posted by on Nov 26, 2013 in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Class Notes, Grappling, Ne Waza, Submissions, Sweeps | 0 comments

BJJ: Closed Guard Combinations

38 Closed Guard BJJ Combinations Everyone Should Know in 4 Minutes – Jason Scully Just like any other position the closed guard is extremely effective if you know what to go for. By knowing core combinations you will be set up much better to attack your opponent at a faster pace and have a better chance of being steps ahead of your opponent. If you are steps ahead of them, then there is a good chance that you will win. It is with combinations and understanding transitions that you start elevating your game to the higher level. There are many set-ups to start a lot of these submission and that is just the beginning. Combinations are what get you much closer to the end....

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BJJ: Animal Drills

Posted by on Nov 26, 2013 in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Class Notes, Ginastica Natural, Grappling, Kids Program | 0 comments

BJJ: Animal Drills

30 Animal Grappling Solo Drills in Less Than 7 Min – Jason Scully  

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