Reading List

Story: A Wizard’s Advice

Posted by on Nov 28, 2013 in Curriculum, Kids Program, Reading List, Stories | 0 comments

Story: A Wizard’s Advice

Excerpted from “The Once and Future King” by T.H.White One day, towards the end of his childhood, the future King Arthur was having a terrible day. Following the advice of his seniors, he went to see his teacher, Merlyn. Asking his advice on the matter Arthur spoke, “Well, what about it?” “The best thing for being sad,” replied Merlyn, beginning to puff and blow, “is to learn something. That is the only thing that never fails. You may grow old and trembling in your anatomies, you may lie awake at night listening to the disorder of your veins, you may miss your only love, you may see the world about you devastated by evil lunatics, or know your honor trampled in the sewers of baser minds. There is only one thing for it then – learn.” “Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never exhaust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting. Learning is the thing for you.” “Look at what a lot of things there are to learn – pure science, the only purity there is. You can learn astronomy in a lifetime, natural history in three, literature in six. And then, after you have exhausted a milliard lifetimes in biology and medicine and theocriticism and geography and history and economics – why you can start to make a cartwheel out of the appropriate wood, or spend fifty years learning to begin to learn to defeat your adversary at fencing. After that you can start again on mathematics, until it is time to learn to plough.” “Do you think you have learned anything?” Merlyn inquired. “I have learned, and been happy.” King Arthur said. “That’s right then,” said Merlyn, “try to remember what you have...

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Story: The War Prayer, By Mark Twain

Posted by on Nov 26, 2013 in Curriculum, Ethics, Kids Program, Reading List, Stories | 1 comment

Story: The War Prayer, By Mark Twain

It was a time of great and exalting excitement. The country was up in arms, the war was on, in every breast burned the holy fire of patriotism; the drums were beating, the bands playing, the toy pistols popping, the bunched firecrackers hissing and spluttering; on every hand and far down the receding and fading spread of roofs and balconies a fluttering wilderness of flags flashed in the sun; daily the young volunteers marched down the wide avenue gay and fine in their new uniforms, the proud fathers and mothers and sisters and sweethearts cheering them with voices choked with happy emotion as they swung by; nightly the packed mass meetings listened, panting, to patriot oratory with stirred the deepest deeps of their hearts, and which they interrupted at briefest intervals with cyclones of applause, the tears running down their cheeks the while; in the churches the pastors preached devotion to flag and country, and invoked the God of Battles beseeching His aid in our good cause in outpourings of fervid eloquence which moved every listener. It was indeed a glad and gracious time, and the half dozen rash spirits that ventured to disapprove of the war and cast a doubt upon its righteousness straightway got such a stern and angry warning that for their personal safety’s sake they quickly shrank out of sight and offended no more in that way. Sunday morning came–next day the battalions would leave for the front; the church was filled; the volunteers were there, their young faces alight with martial dreams–visions of the stern advance, the gathering momentum, the rushing charge, the flashing sabers, the flight of the foe, the tumult, the enveloping smoke, the fierce pursuit, the surrender! Then home from the war, bronzed heroes, welcomed, adored, submerged in golden seas of glory! With the volunteers sat their dear ones, proud, happy, and envied by the neighbors and friends who had no sons and brothers to send forth to the field of honor, there to win for the flag, or, failing, die the noblest of noble deaths. The service proceeded; a war chapter from the Old Testament was read; the first prayer was said; it was followed by an organ burst that shook the building, and with one impulse the house rose, with glowing eyes and beating hearts, and poured out that tremendous invocation: God the all-terrible! Thou who ordainest Thunder thy clarion and lightning thy sword! Then came the “long” prayer. None could remember the like of it for passionate pleading and moving and beautiful language. The burden of its supplication was, that an ever-merciful and benignant Father of us all would watch over our noble young soldiers, and aid, comfort, and encourage them in their patriotic work; bless them, shield them in the day of battle and the hour of peril, bear them in His mighty hand, make them strong and confident, invincible in the bloody onset; help them crush the foe, grant to them and to their flag and country imperishable honor and glory– An aged stranger entered and moved with slow and noiseless step up the main aisle, his eyes fixed upon the minister, his long body clothed in a robe that reached to his feet, his head bare, his white hair descending in a frothy cataract to...

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Zen in the Martial Arts

Posted by on Nov 21, 2013 in Curriculum, Jeet Kune Do, Reading List | 0 comments

Zen in the Martial Arts

This book by Joe Hyams was absolutely instrumental in my early education as a Martial Artist, and my development as a teacher of the Martial Arts. I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve returned to this book over the years. I still teach many of the lessons contained within, and always recommend this to my committed students. In addition to his perspective on training, and zen, Hyams also offers some very rare vignettes of what it was like to train directly under Bruce Lee. Friends, if you’re interested in purchasing this book, or others from Amazon.com, why not help us out in the process? A (small) percentage of every sale that comes from this website will go towards helping us maintain this site. If you enjoy the content we’re providing, and would like to help, consider clicking on this image to shop Amazon. The link will open in a new window....

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Tao of Jeet Kune Do

Posted by on Nov 21, 2013 in Bruce Lee, Curriculum, Jeet Kune Do, Reading List | 0 comments

Tao of Jeet Kune Do

Perfect for serious students of Jeet Kune Do, this book is one of the many classics of Martial Arts. Although not a story or typical work of non-fiction, this text offers insight into the mind of the founder of Jeet Kune Do. This is also an interesting snapshot into the nature of Martial Arts training at the time that this was originally published. Friends, if you’re interested in purchasing this book, or others from Amazon.com, why not help us out in the process? A (small) percentage of every sale that comes from this website will go towards helping us maintain this site. If you enjoy the content we’re providing, and would like to help, consider clicking on this image to shop Amazon. The link will open in a new window....

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